5 Easy Tips for Pain-Free Gardening

For most of us, spring and summer is the time of year when the weeds in our yard start calling!  When the weeds go crazy, we might feel overwhelmed and want to do it all in one weekend, however, as I’m sure you have figured out, this is not a great idea.  Overdoing it can often mean an increase in aches and pains, especially back pain.

Whether you are planning on weeding the flower beds, mulching, pruning, planting, or all of the above, there are a few steps you can take to help prevent residual soreness the following few days.

GET THE GEAR:  Before working in the yard, it is important to have to proper gear: hat, suntan lotion, sunglasses, and a water bottle.  You’ve all heard it before, staying hydrated and protected from the sun is a must!

WARM-UP:  Get those muscles warmed and loose by going for a short 5-10 minute walk.  In addition, it is a good idea to perform some dynamic stretches, such a walking lunges with a torso twist, skipping or high knee walking.  Yard work is hard work and skipping a warm-up will put excess strain on your muscles and joints, increasing your chance of an injury.

TAKE BREAKS: Don’t get so caught up in the work, that you forget to take frequent breaks. They don’t have to be long, but it is important to take time to stretch and get a drink of water.

CHECK YOUR FORM: Whether it’s bending over weeding, shoveling or spreading mulch or pushing a lawn mower, all of these jobs put extra strain on your back. By altering your form while you do some of these activities, you can decrease your chances of having back pain.  Here are some suggestions:

Weeding:
– Good idea: Kneel on a soft mat to save your back and knees.
– Better idea: Sit on a stool and rest your elbows on your knees
– Change positions frequently to avoid overuse

Trimming the Hedges:
– Keep your back straight
– Utilize small strokes to prevent strain in neck and shoulders
– Rest every 5-7 minutes to give you back a rest… it will thank you later.

Wheel barrel:
– Bend your knees to lift, NOT your back
– Try not to twist while holding the handles. Wheel barrels can easily be unbalanced…if it starts to go, you do not want to be pulled down with it.
– Push, do not pull.

Shoveling:
– Keep feet firmly planted on the ground
– Keep hips forward, facing where you are shoveling to prevent twisting of the back
– If you are moving dirt from one place to another, pick up your feet and turn your entire body to face the side you will be placing the dirt. This may seem unnatural and may take a little longer, however you could be saving your back from days of soreness.

Lifting :
– As temping as it is to get it all in one load, save your back and take two trips with smaller loads.
– Make sure to keep the load close to your body.

COOL DOWN/STRETCHINGOnce you’ve had your fill, it is a good idea to take a few moments to cool down and stretch.  Often your body might tell you what body part could use a good stretch, but if you are looking for a few suggestions, we’ve got you covered:

Yard work can be fun, especially when you get the whole family involved, but taking a few steps to lesson injury risk can go a long way to keeping the garden weed-free all summer long!

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